How to Write an Education Business Proposal

Do you have an idea for a new educational program or service? Maybe you want to apply for a government grant for an after-school program for middle school kids, organize a private high school, or develop a network of tutors for hire.

How are you going to get the money you need and explain your ideas to the influential people who can make it happen? The best way is to master the art of writing a proposal.

If you are replying to an RFP (Request for Proposal) or applying for a specific grant, you need to follow any instructions specified in the RFP or grant application as precisely as possible. An RFP response typically requires combining government agency forms with topics you need to write from scratch – based on what the RFP asks you talk about.

All proposals follow a basic structure: introduction, the recipient/client-oriented section, the description of proposed goods and/or services, and then the proposal writer/supplier-oriented section. The content of each section will vary from one proposal to the next, but this sequence of sections should stay the same.

Let’s break down those sections further. The introduction section is the shortest. The very first thing you’ll want for your proposal is a Cover Letter. A Cover Letter should be brief, and it should contain the following four elements: a brief explanation of who you are, a statement about why you are submitting this proposal at this time, a statement of what you want the reader to do after reading your proposal–call for a meeting, sign the contract, etc., and all your contact information so the reader can easily call you with questions or to accept your proposal.

The very first page of your proposal package should be a Title Page–just name your proposal something appropriate, like “Advanced Science Seminars Offered for the Jacobi School Gifted Program” or “Proposal to Create a New Charter School in the West Valley School District.” Next, if your proposal is long and detailed, you may want an Executive Summary or Client Summary Page, which is a summation of the most important points you want to make, and a Table of Contents to help readers easily see the contents and navigate through the proposal. That’s all for the introduction section.

The next section should be focused on the proposal recipient or client. Depending on what you are proposing, the readers you want to target might be members of a grant committee, potential students, parents of students, teachers, school administrators, a loan committee, or a governmental organization. It’s important to consider them carefully, and tailor your information to them. What do they want to know? What concerns might they have? Are there scheduling or budget restrictions? At the very least, this client-oriented section should have a Requirements page that summarizes what they have asked for, or what you believe they need. You may also want pages like Schedule, Deadlines, Limitations, Budget, Goals, Considerations, Special Needs, and so forth, to describe in detail your understanding of what the client needs. This is not yet the time to brag about your proposed program or your organization. Keep this section focused on information about what the client wants or needs.

The next section is a description of your ideas. Be sure to match them up with the previous section, explaining how you can address the client’s needs, how the client will benefit from your proposed program, and what your proposal will cost to implement. Don’t use generic sales jargon. Instead, be as specific as possible about what you plan to do. This section could contain a wide variety of topic pages, like Classes, Equipment, Schedule, Staff, Venues, Tutoring, Testing, Mentoring, Evaluation, and so forth–you’ll include whatever you need to thoroughly describe your proposal. At a bare minimum, you’ll want a Services Offered, Benefits, and a Cost Summary page in this section.

After you have thoroughly described what you want to do and how much it will cost, it’s time to tell the proposal readers all about you in the final section. What makes you or your organization qualified to take on this job? It’s not enough to simply say “I can do it” or boast about how smart you are. Keep in mind that it’s always best to provide evidence or testimonials from other parties than to do your own bragging. Do you have special Training, Certifications, or Education? Do you have an extensive Company History, a long list of Clients, or years of Experience in the field? Have you won Awards? Do you have Testimonials or Case Studies to offer to show how you have been successful in the past? Include any information that helps persuade the clients that you have the knowledge and professionalism to carry out your proposal promises.

At this point, you will have completed the first draft of your proposal. Congratulations! Now for the finishing touches. Have a qualified proofreader or editor read through your draft and fix any grammatical or spelling errors. It’s always best to enlist someone who is not familiar with your ideas to do this. That person is much more likely to catch errors and ask important questions than someone who knows your proposal well. It would be especially embarrassing to submit an error-ridden proposal for an education project, wouldn’t it?

After the words are perfect, make sure each page looks good, too. You might want to use visual details like splashes of color in titles or special bullet points to add interest, but keep the overall look professional.

That’s it! Print out your proposal or package it into a PDF file, and deliver it to the client or committee. Be sure to use whichever delivery method was specified by the client, or deliver it in the way you believe will most impress the recipients (email, upload to a web server, print and mail, etc.). Remember, you want your proposal to succeed, not end up in the heap with a hundred others, so it might be worthwhile to hand-deliver it or use another special method. Then, after a reasonable period of time, follow up with a phone call to make sure your proposal was received and give the clients a chance to ask questions.

After you have written one proposal, you’ll find that the next one is easier and faster to write, and that you can re-use a lot of the same information in multiple proposals. But it’s important to customize each one to the specific recipient; that’s the difference between proposal writing and mass marketing.

Proposal writing packages can make your proposal writing and formatting easier. A pre-designed proposal kit will include hundreds of templates, including all the ones mentioned above. You can find a page for almost any topic. The writing and details to include are up to you, but each template in a kit includes examples and instructions that remind you of typical information for that topic, so you’ll feel like you have a guide throughout the writing process.

Use a professionally designed proposal kit, so your proposal will look great, too. You can find kits with design themes or insert your own company logo. Make sure to use a kit that includes a large collection of sample proposals, too, including some education-oriented ones. Sample proposals give you ideas of contents and looks for finished proposals. You’ll find that a pre-designed proposal kit gives you a big head start on your first proposal.

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How to Save Time and Money When Buying Computer Hardware and Services for Educational Institutions

From elementary school to universities, computers are becoming the new “teacher’s assistant” and there is no sign of this trend slowing down. Unfortunately, the need for high technology equipment like HP desktops, HP workstations and HP storage devices is growing faster than the budgets needed to support this explosive growth. That’s why it is so important for educational institutions to partner with total technology solution providers who have access to special educational pricing and who have the capabilities and the knowledge needed to help determine computer hardware specifications, prepare quotes and handle the procurement, installation and configuration process.

Navigating the computer hardware purchasing maze can not only be time-consuming, it can be expensive as well. Educational computer hardware pricing varies among suppliers and can even vary within the same supplier depending upon the quantity being purchased and how the HP quote is prepared.

It makes sense that an educational institution placing an order for 50 HP laptops, for example, is going to receive better per-unit pricing than a school that is only ordering one. But that’s not always the case. Many schools are discovering that they can get preferred pricing even if they are only ordering a handful of HP printers IF they place their HP quotes through the right IT service provider.

If your computer hardware requirements include HP desktops, HP notebooks, HP storage devices, HP workstations, or any other HP hardware for educational institutions, here are some time and money-saving tips you can’t afford to ignore:

1. Always partner with HP hardware solutions providers that have experience in the educational institutions channel. These providers can contact HP on your behalf to negotiate the best pricing and delivery times.

2. Only work with an HP hardware solutions provider who will also install and configure your HP computer products and who provide personalized account management. Service that stops after the sale is not really a service at all.

3. Let your educational institution HP computer partner assist you in preparing your HP computer hardware specifications and submitting your HP quotes. This way you’ll have the best chance of specifying the right HP computer products that will provide maximum performance at the lowest possible price.

4. Try to bundle your HP hardware purchases together with other schools in your district, or with your local government or state government agencies, whenever possible. This can help to leverage your buying power even further and can often move your school into the level of “preferred customer” which may result in even better pricing and a higher service-level commitment from your HP solutions provider.

Educational institutions have an obligation to provide their staff and student body with the best available technology and the lowest possible price. Choose the right technology partner and you’ll find that you can buy quality HP laptops, HP servers, HP printers and other HP computer hardware at a fair price and still get all the after-sale support you’ll ever need.

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Montessori: An Education Theory

Moving aims and habits of one generation onto the next is what education is built on, but there isn’t just one way of doing this – there are hundreds of theories. One of these was developed in the late 1800s by a certain Mara Montessori.

The style, which is now found in as many as 20,000 schools across the globe, and is for children up to 18 years old has shown itself to be very worthy. With children working best when they are the ones who set the boundaries, Montessori works well to show freedom, independence and psychological development through many practices.

Here we will take a look at the theory that comes with Montessori education:

- Self construction, spontaneous activity and liberty – An education approach that is based around the human development model, it has two main elements. Through environment interaction, these children manage to be involved in psychological self-construction. In addition, consider how the psychological development path can change and, especially for those under six, the chance for choice in boundaries offers great strides.

- Human tendencies – While the universal and innate characteristics were first seen thanks to studies by Montessori, it was her son who actually coined the phrase. By offering up things like order, repetition, self-perfection,exploration and self-preservation you can drive early development.

- Prepared environment – As previously stated, this theory is pretty much worked around the premise of having limits but offering choices within them. Thanks to a use of construction, beauty and order, a child is able to develop independence thanks to psychological directives.

- Development planes – According to Montessori, we have four distinct planes of human development – birth to six, six to 12, 12 to 18 and 18 to 24. And, from the absorbent mind, sensitive periods and normalization that we see in the first to embracing science and culture in the final it is a great foundation for life.

- Peace and education – A famous quote from Montessori summed up her determination to find the theory behind education – “preventing conflicts is the work of politics; establishing peace is the work of education”. She created a practice to her theory that she completely believed had a role to play across the world, and this was shown through her six Nobel Peace Prize nominations.

With this we see how this theory of education has been set up. Since it was first started, Montessori has been received very well and continues to go strong. Always be sure that the programme in question sticks to the theories and ideals that she discovered all those years ago.

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